My family and I recently went on a trip – our first airplane trip since we’ve started in earnest to become zero waste.  We did some planning on our way out to try to fly zero waste, but here’s a picture of the wreckage from the way home:

 

We got thirsty, we got hungry, and I needed a cocktail 🙂 .  A couple of the cups got recycled already, but you get the gist.

We packed lots sandwiches and snacks.  We each had our own water bottle and filled them before we got on the plane.  But here’s what happened – our flight home was delayed an hour, a bunch of the sandwiches we made were “too spicy” for the kids.  Also, even though our flight was nearly 6 hours, the flight attendants wouldn’t refill our water bottles and would only pour out water into their cups.  We also didn’t remember to bring earbuds for everyone and our snacks (fruit) weren’t as exciting as the little mystery packets from the flight attendants. 

I try to think about this zero waste fail as a learning opportunity for me and my family.  So I took a moment to reflect on what we could do differently next time to minimize the waste the next time we travel.

Tips for flying zero (or near zero) waste with kids:

  1. Bring larger water bottles! 
  2. Bring snacks from bulk that are as enticing as the junk food in the airport.
  3. Remember to bring earbuds for everyone.
  4. Bring some extra food – flights get delayed all the time!  Better to have too much than run out and end up buying at the airport or on the airplane.
  5. Talk about our food and drink plans at the airport and on the airplane before we get in the situation.
  6. Offer a juice option before or after the flight as a replacement for the juice we won’t be having on the plane.
  7. Bring a variety of sandwich/wrap/whatever options.  If one turns out too “spicy”, there’s a back up.

On a side note, learning to say “no” to the flight attendants’ offers of drinks and snacks is an ongoing process in my house.  These little prepackaged snacks and fruit drinks are perceived as treats to my kids, and saying no is not our natural inclination.  We are working on this 🙂 .  

That’s what I’ve learned this time around.  Do you have any tips for traveling zero waste with kids?  I’d love to hear them in the comments!

Thanks for reading!

Liz

The amount of textile waste in the US has grown tremendously over the last couple of decades.  The US contributes about 15 million tons of textiles to the landfills each year.  This is particularly depressing given that up to 95% of textiles could be diverted from the landfills with recycling and reuse efforts.  (See smartasn.org for more information on textile waste and recycling).  

 

The fashion industry is a major contributor to this waste, especially fast fashion brands that make cheap, not-built-to-last articles of clothing (e.g., Forever 21, Top Shop – see Newsweek’s 9/9/2016 article about fast fashion).  Typically the clothes from these stores don’t sell as well at second-hand shops, and can end up donated overseas where their poor quality makes them less desirable as well.

 

As someone who is introducing textiles into the world, I am particularly concerned about keeping my textiles (and others) out of the landfill.  Luckily, there are many ways to keep them out of the waste stream and in circulation.  Here’s my top ten ways to keep textiles like clothes and household fabrics out of the landfill:

 

No Trace’s 10 list for keeping textiles out of the landfill:

  1. Shop less, buy quality, and extend the life of your clothes and household textiles.
  2. Buy secondhand whenever possible.
  3. Buy from companies that recycle their products or used recycled materials (e.g., Patagonia, Eileen Fisher, and Insecta).
  4. Purchase 100% natural fiber fabrics (e.g., cotton, wool, hemp), rather than synthetic fabrics, which can be composted at the end of their lifecycle.  Purchase organic when you can as well.  
  5. Repurpose your textiles into something functional like a bag, bin, or a t-shirt quilt once they are worn out or outgrown.
  6. Find a fabric recycler near you:   smartasn.org has resources
  7. Find an artist, local art organization, art school, or even an animal shelter that might be interested in donations.
  8. Re-purpose your worn or stained items into hankerchiefs, papertowels, washclothes, and rags for use around the house.
  9. Donate your gently used things to a second hand store.  Note that these donations, if they don’t sell, can end up in the landfill.  Estimates range from only 20% all the way to 75% of donated clothes are resold.  (See Newsweek’s 9/9/2016 article for details).
  10. Compost as a very last resort if it is 100% natural fibers – shred it first and remove any buttons or zippers.

 

I hope this list helps!  I’m making efforts to reduce my textile waste.  One of my resolutions this year is not to buy any clothes for the rest of 2017.  I’d love to hear from you – what are you going to do to reduce your textile footprint?

 

Thanks for reading!

 

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