Here’s the thing – I’m not a chef.  I work full-time (and sometimes more), as does my partner. And we have two kiddos with dance or piano lessons every day of the week (except Sunday).

SO, our dinners have to be FAST.  Easy.  Kid-friendly.  Vegan.  And low waste.  Here’s what we’re eating this week for dinners.

Our low waste vegan meal plan for the week

Fruits & veggies for the week.

We shop for these in our cloth veggie bags that you can buy here.  I take them out of their bag for the pic but we keep them in these cloth veggie bags  in the fridge or in a hanging fruit basket in the kitchen. 

This week we bought:

  • lettuce
  • ginger root
  • cilantro
  • garlic
  • fresh tumeric
  • carrots
  • cabbage
  • sweet peppers
  • onions
  • cucumber
  • jalapeno
  • onions
  • tomatoes
  • cauliflower
  • bananas
  • brussel spouts
  • mushrooms
  • string beans (still in their bags) – see bottom picture.

 

And a day or so before we made our big grocery run, we got kale, bananas, lemons, mangos, oranges, apples, avocados, and bread in a paper bag.

quick mini-grocery run

This is a pretty typical haul for us.  I have lots of green smoothies for breakfasts.  We have lots of veggies at each dinner.  And the kids take fruits and veggies in their lunches pretty much every day.

 

Pantry staples from bulk bins

We take our own clean containers like mason jars, old veganaise jars, old olive jars, and others to fill with staples that are a little messier.  We weigh the jars before we fill them.  Most stores have a scale you can use to get the weight of your container (aka the tare weight).  Or you can ask a cashier to weigh it. 

This week in jars we bought:

  • coffee beans
  • salt
  • corn flake cereal
  • nutritional yeast. 

We put nutritional yeast on everything – pasta, salads, fancy toast, popcorn, veggies.  Nutritional yeast (aka nuty yeast) gives food a little earthy-salty flavor. Plus its got vitamins and minerals.

the main weekly grocery run

For foods from bulk that aren’t too messy, we put them straight into the same cloth bags you can purchase here.  This week in bags we bought:

  • ramen noodles
  • chocolate chips
  • sushi rice
  • cornmeal. 

We should’ve put the cornmeal in a jar – it got the bag pretty powdery and I’m still finding bits of cornmeal in our grocery bags ;).  Next time….

 

Packaged foods

We aren’t perfect and still get a few packaged goods most of the time.  We pick foods that are yummy, will simplify meal prep, and are popular with the kids.  Or essential for my coffee (COCONUT MILK!).  Or when the bulk version is out of stock.  This week olive oil was out of stock, so we got it packaged. 

So this week’s packaged foods were:

  • a yummy vegan dip called Bitchin’ Sauce that my kids will put on just about any vegetable in their lunches and on their sandwiches. 
  • Corn and flour tortillas for taco/burrito night and for lunches and snacks. 
  • Coconut milk for my coffee. 
  • Olive oil for everything every day. 

Our low waste vegan meal plan for the week

Here’s what we’re eating this week.  All low waste vegan meals:

  1. Sushi bowls with sushi rice (I found a recipe online that was yummy and easy – rice wine vinegar and sugar) plus finely sliced carrots, cucumbers, and avocado.  Plus local seaweed we get in a paper bag at the Santa Cruz farmers market.  A little dab of veganaise.  Soy sauce.  Pickled ginger from a little glass jar that we’ll reuse.  We put all of this into a bowl together.  Super yum.  Kids asked for this meal this week and they ate it up!
  2. Tacos/burritos with pressure-cooked pinto beans; brown rice cooked with onions and spices; homemade salsa made with chopped tomatoes, cilantro, onion, jalapeno, lemon juice, and salt; shredded cabbage tossed in a little veganaise; super simple homemade guacamole (avocados + lemon juice + salt), and tortillas.
  3. Ramen noodle bowls with
    • ramen noodles;
    • veggie broth (from bulk);
    • sauteed onions with fresh garlic and ginger;
    • sauteed mushrooms;
    • fresh thinly sliced carrots, zucchinis, and cabbage and cilantro;
    • beef-style TVP (boiled, drained, and then tossed in a quick and dirty “teriyaki” sauce of soy sauce, powdered ginger, peanut oil, rice vinegar and sugar;
    • plus roasted cauliflower for the side or with the bowl
    • lemon wedges. 
    • And a couple hot sauces in glass jars.

This dinner was super popular with the kiddos and grown-ups.  It probably took about an hour from start to finish, but we had leftovers to help out with other meals so I don’t mind the time too much.  Plus I love eating lots of veggies at dinner.  

ramen bowl dinner

.

4.  Homemade pizza, with quick homemade dough topped with vegan homemade cashew cheese (see Nora Cooks Vegan for her awesome vegan cashew queso!).  Plus sauteed bell peppers, onions, and mushrooms.  And chopped olives. Plus a green salad and probably some popcorn and probably a movie too.  

 

So there you have it – our low waste vegan meal plan for this week.  Does this give you any ideas for your upcoming dinners?  I’d love to hear in the comments below!

 

Thanks for reading!

Liz @ No Trace

Easy DIY zero waste snack bag tutorial

Hey there!  I’ve got an easy, step-by-step tutorial for you to make these cute snack and sandwich bags!  

 

These sew up super fast and easy.  You’ll want to make a bunch for yourself and give them to everyone on your gift list!

These are an eco-friendly alternative to plastic bags.  Plastic bags are choking our environment!  Use these cuties instead!

 

The smaller bags work great for:

Trail mix

Almonds

Cookies

Goldfish crackers

Pretzels

Crackers

 

Some folks use them for other purposes like:

 

A mini wallet

Dog treats

Holding your essential oil jars

Hair clips & rubberbands

Seaglass and other special treasures

 

Basically anything small.  You get it ;).

 

The larger bags work great for:

A sandwich

A croissant

Lots of popcorn

A big bunch of grapes

A scone

 

Or you could use the larger size in your bag to hold your zero waste kit together.  I like to put a napkin, utensils, straw, and beeswax wrap inside mine and keep it in my purse.  You could also use it in your luggage to hold your hankies or socks or undies together. They work for art supplies too – markers, crayons, colored pencils and a small notebook.  Basically any medium-sized thing.   

 

By now you see that you NEED some of these baggies in your life!  Some in your kitchen. Some in your backpack. Some in your purse.  Some in your luggage. Right??

 

So let me show you how to make them!

 

Materials needed:

 

Fabric: 

All-natural fabrics like cotton, linen, and hemp are the best.  Organic fabrics are even better. Nylon or water-resistant type fabrics are more difficult to deal with at the end of their usable life.  Those synthetic fibers usually end up in the landfill. Plus some aren’t food safe. All-natural fabrics can be composted at the end of their usable life, so they never need to end up in a landfill.

 

I use two layers of organic cotton poplin/quilters weight or one layer of poplin and one layer of canvas for my baggies.

 

For the snack baggies you need 2 pieces that measure 5.5” wide by 9” long.  

 

For the sandwich baggies you need 2 pieces that measure 8” wide by 18” long.

 

Supplies:

Thread, Scissors, ruler or measuring tape, pins, pencil or chopstick, fabric chalk or marker if you have one.

 

Now that you have your supplies gathered… 

 

Step 1: Cut your fabric to size.

 

If your fabric has a pattern with a right and wrong direction (for example, something like this)

 


 

cut it so that 9” corresponds with the length of the pattern, like this:

5.5″ wide and 9″ tall

For the sandwich bag, make sure the pattern length is 18”.

 

That way when your bag is complete, you’ll see the pattern in the right direction.

 

Step 2: Line up your fabric

 

Whether you’re making the snack size or the sandwich size, these steps are the same!

 

Place your two pieces of fabric together with right sides facing each other (so you see the back sides of the fabric).

picture of fabric with right sides facing each other
right sides facing each other

Get some pins and pin them together in a few spots.

 

Mark a 3” opening on one long side with pins or your fabric marker.  This 3” opening is how you turn the bag right side out later. You WON’T be sewing over this 3” opening.  

Pin along sides and mark a 3″ opening on one long side.

Step 3: Sew the two pieces together.

 

Take your two pieces to your machine and start at one side of your 3” opening (remember: you are leaving a 3” opening for later).  Backstitch at the start and then stitch along the edges with a ¼” seam allowance until you get to the other side of your 3” opening.  Backstitch again at the end. 

Finished stitching along all 4 sides, leaving the 3″ opening.

Step 4: Turn your bag right sides out.  

 

Before you turn it right sides out, cut the extra fabric to the right of your seams just at the corners.  This gets rid of the extra fabric at the corners. Make sure not to cut any of your stitches.

Cut off the extra fabric at the corners

 

Use the 3” opening that you didn’t sew over to push the right sides out through the hole.  Use a chopstick or the eraser end of a pencil to pus. Make sure to get the corners poked out with the eraser end of a pencil or a chopstick.  

Pull the fabric right side out through the opening.
Use your chopstick to push out the corners

Press your bag at the iron for nice crisp edges.

 

Step 5 (optional): Topstitch the outer flap of your bag.

 

If you want a more polished look, topstitch the outer flap of the bag with a ⅛” seam allowance.

 

The outer flap of the bag will be the bottom of your fabric if it has a directional print to it.  If the print doesn’t have a right or wrong direction, just pick which edge you want to lay on top of the other flap and top stitch that one.  

Top stitch along this edge of the bag.

 

Step 6: Fold your bag up and pin the sides.

 

For the snack size, you want to fold the bottom up about 3″ (the part that doesn’t have the top stitching). 

Fold the bottom of the bag up by 3″

And fold the top flap (the edge with the top stitching) down about 2 inches.

Top edge is folded about 2″, for total bag height of 4″

This gives you a final bag size of about 4”. Pin along the sides.  

 

For the sandwich size, you want to fold the top flap down about 3 inches and the bottom up about 7”.  This gives you a final bag size of about 8”. Pin along the sides.  

 

Make sure that the unsewn edge/opening is folded in so that it’ll get caught in your seam when you sew.  

 

Pin the flap down to keep it in place as you sew.

 

Step 7: Stitch the sides closed

 

Take the pinned bag back to your machine and stitch up the sides, one at a time, with a ¼” seam allowance.  Make sure to backstitch at the beginning and end of each side. You’re only sewing up the sides of the bag – not the top or bottom folds.  

Stitch along the sides with 1/4″ seam allowance

Afterward, check that you caught all of your fabric in the seams by looking inside your bag. 

  

Step 8: Trim off the loose threads.

 

Cut any loose threads off the sides. 

Carefully trim loose threads from the bag

 

Then you’re done! Repeat and repeat as many times as you need :).  

 

Have you made one of these cuties?  Has it replaced plastic bags for you?  Let me know in the comments below! I’d love to hear from you :).

 

p.s. – just want to buy some?  CLICK HERE TO SHOP FOR SNACK & SANDWICH BAGS!

10 reasons to avoid bioplastics

Despite being considered “eco-friendly,” bioplastics might be causing more problems than they solve.  Below are 10 reasons to avoid bioplastics. Each one based on scientific research. But first let’s get to know these materials, shall we?

 

Bioplastics are plastics made from plants instead of fossil fuels.  The two most common and general types of bioplastics are PLAs (which are made from sugars) and PHAs (which are made from microorganisms that are fed plant-based oils).  

 

Bioplastics are often described by manufacturers as “compostable”.  Compostable means it’ll breakdown in a compost at the same rate as other organic material (i.e., food scraps) without any special conditions.  And compostable means they won’t leave any toxins behind. Sometimes bioplastics are described as “biodegradable”. Biodegradable means something will breakdown eventually in the right conditions, but not necessarily in a traditional compost system.

 

Compared to regular plastic, having an alternative like bioplastics that won’t biodegrade into toxins is a huge improvement.  Having an alternative that’s not made from fossil fuels is also a big improvement! The potential to compost food scraps and it’s packaging in the same bin could help cut tons of waste.  And the potential to make bioplastics from organic waste (rather than crops) is also an amazing promise that some companies are working on.

 

With all this good news, lots of businesses have jumped on the bioplastics bandwagon.  Globally, the bioplastics market was worth $17 billion dollars in 2017 and produced over 2 million tons of bioplastic (see this report for details).  Bioplastics are showing up in grocery store aisles, as cups, straws, forks, product packaging, doggie bags, mailers, and more!

Bioplastics are showing up as packaging everywhere.
Bioplastic candy wrapper

But the potential of bioplastics to solve our trash problem isn’t happening.  Right now, bioplastics are creating a slew of problems instead of solving them.

 

Here are 10 reasons that bioplastics are not a solution to plastic pollution.

 

  1. Not always made from plants

To be called a bioplastic, it only needs to contain a minimum of 20% renewable material (i.e, plant-based).  So this means that some could have as much as 80% petroleum-based materials. That means they won’t compost as promised and they create the same plastic pollution problems as regular plastic.  If these bioplastics end up in composts, they have the potential to contaminate organic material.

 

2. Their production is more polluting

One2010 study found that the production of bioplastics results in more pollution than the production of traditional plastics.  This increased pollution comes from the agricultural processes to grow the crops that become bioplastics. Creating bioplastics also led to more ozone depletion and required more land to create than traditional plastics.

 

3. Some have carcinogens

Although they don’t contain BPA (a chemical found in regular plastics that may cause health problems for humans), some bioplastics are associated with increased carcinogens.  The same 2010 study found that bioplastics made with fossil fuels (these are called B-PET plastics) had the highest impact on “carcinogenic health hazards” across its life cycle. 

 

4. They increase pressure on our lands

In order to produce most bioplastics, crops have to be grown.  This creates more demand for farmland. In order to feed the planet without destroying it, we’ll have to take a hard look at how we use our land.  Using land to create packaging instead of food probably doesn’t make a lot of sense.  

 

5. Won’t compost at home

They won’t compost in your yard or worm bin.  Home composting is a super green way to cut waste on lots of levels.  You can turn those organics back into soil. You don’t need any transportation to move them from your house to a facility.  It’s cheap (or even free) to do at home. But bioplastics won’t compost at home. They have to be sent away and processed like all other trash.

 

6. Hard to compost anywhere

Very few cities have facilities to compost bioplastics – i.e., industrial composting facilities.  An industrial composting facility allows “materials to reach 140 degrees F for 10 consecutive days”, according to this report. Although the exact number of facilities that can achieve these conditions isn’t easy to know, there aren’t many.  

 

And even among those facilities that do exist, many of them don’t want any bioplastics because they take longer to breakdown than other materials.  This slows down composting and costs facilities more money. Fastcompany.com reports that less than 90 cities in the US accept compostable packaging.  

 

7. They can contaminate recycling.  

Folks get confused about what to do with their bioplastics, and so they often end up in the recycle bin.  Then they get mixed in with traditional plastics at the recycling plant since they’re hard to tell apart. As a result, our cities can accidentally send loads of traditional plastic that are contaminated with bioplastics to plastic recyclers.  When plastic recyclers see the contamination, they start to reject our entire plastic loads. This puts a major strain on our ability to recycle any plastic. And it’s already become a challenge to recycle traditional plastics across the US.

Bioplastics can contaminate our recycling.
Bioplastics can contaminate our recycling.

8. They release methane

When bioplastics end up in landfills, which is where most of them end up, they release methane.  Methane is a super powerful greenhouse gas.

 

9. They won’t biodegrade on their own

When bioplastics like PLA end up in the ocean or forests or meadows or streams, they won’t biodegrade.  Instead, they become another source of litter, just like traditional plastics.

 

10. Still single-use

Here’s the biggest problem of all: they promote a single-use mentality.  Folks see bioplastics as an eco-friendly single-use option. The problem is that there’s no such thing as eco-friendly single-use.  To create anything that will only get used once and then discarded is wasteful. Of course, in some situations single-use is the only option or the best option, like medical settings.  But single-use plastics should be an exception for certain situations, rather than the norm for everything we consume and use.  

 

We need to switch from a single-use mentality to a reusable mentality.  We need to recognize that the world has finite resources. All of these resources should be conserved and protected as much as possible.

 

This isn’t to say that bioplastics are worthless.  If we had better systems in place for capturing and composting bioplastics, and more efficient, less polluting ways of creating bioplastics, that would be awesome.  Bioplastics have the potential to fill an important need in plastics with renewable resources.

 

But at this point in time, with our current resources, bioplastics don’t solve all our problems.  And they have lots of issues that need to be addressed.  

 

The main problem for us to solve is to reduce our dependence on single-use plastic as much as possible.  Bioplastics don’t get us any closer.

 

Do you have thoughts on bioplastics?  I’d love to hear in the comments below!

Thanks for reading and for all that you do for the planet,

Liz

P.S. Want more nitty-gritty info on bioplastics?  Check out my sources:

https://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/2017/12/13/the-truth-about-bioplastics/ 

https://www.fastcompany.com/90393297/will-compostable-packaging-ever-be-able-to-solve-our-waste-problem 

http://ncrarecycles.org/2019/03/oregon-composters-push-back/ 

https://www.thebalancesmb.com/what-does-biodegradable-mean-2538213 

https://ilsr.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/state-of-composting-in-us.pdf

https://greenamerica.org/take-plastics-challenge/bioplastics-benefits-and-pitfalls 

Hey friends, Want some Eco-Friendly Products to green your life?

Luckily, there are SO many ways that you can help make the planet a cleaner, greener place.

Today I wanted to share my current Favorite Top 10 eco-friendly products.

super easy to use, easy to find online or in your town, sometimes used!, and all under $25!

And that all help reduce plastic and other pollution. Win, win, win, win!

These eco-friendly products are super easy swaps for polluting plastic and paper waste! Just imagine, If we all used these, there would be so much less plastic pollution in the world. We could save TONS of plastic and paper from landfills, beaches, rivers, and oceans! I don’t know if this happens to you, too, but EVERYTIME I see a sea creature that’s been harmed or killed by plastic pollution, I feel just awful. AND it helps me re-energize and recommit to avoiding plastic wherever I can! Did you know that even paper products create greenhouse gases if they aren’t disposed of properly? Even though they are biodegradable, they won’t biodegrade well in a landfill.

So, here are my top 10 super affordable and eco-friendly products to make the world a greener place.

Plus, some of my tips on incorporating these into your life!

1. Bamboo toothbrush

These are awesome. You can find some that are 100% compostable, and that will easily breakdown in your own home compost (or city compost, if you are one of the lucky few to have this option!). I love them.

My toothbrush tip for you – if you (and any kids of yours) visit the dentist regularly, they’ll probably try to give you a plastic toothbrush. Be prepared! Let them know that you don’t need the freebie plastic toothbrush that they have for you, and tell them you use a bamboo toothbrush. You might even encourage them to start handing out bamboo brushes too! Eco-friendly dentist? Yes, please!

2. Travel coffee mug

I actually have a few of these right now and they are AWESOME. I use mine EVERY. SINGLE. DAY and haven’t used a disposable coffee cup for probably a couple years now. And there are SO many awesome options out there. I love them all. You can probably even find some at your local thrift store!

My kids and I use a travel mug for hot chocolate from the coffee shop too – they are ready for their own! Luckily I have enough to share with them for now. In a pinch, we just bring a regular mug from home. Lots of coffee shops will give you a discount, too, for bringing your own mug! Yay for discounts!

3. Reusable veggie bags

Single use plastic bags are the worst. They aren’t always recyclable, they can be super polluting, and they may even leech toxins into food. Yuck. Introducing: reusable veggie bags! Now, I’m not ashamed to promote my own here – made with upcycled cotton, even! BUT there are lots of options on the market, and these are the types of things you can even sew on your own with very few sewing skills! So, get the ones that work for you, but get some! I use mine to shop with AND I even store my greens and other veggies in them.

Side note tip for you: there are some great ideas for storing veggies without plastic on pinterest – check out some of my favorite boards for tips here for how to keep you goods crisp and fresh, without using plastic.

4. Reusable straw

This feels a little luxurious, but is still so super affordable! If you have kiddos and you like to go out to eat once and a while, it’s fun to whip out your reusable straw and let them feel a little extra fancy with their beverage. They are also great for enjoying a smoothie on the go.

My tip on using a reusable straw and straws in general – you often have to act super fast to avoid getting a plastic straw at a restaurant, cafe, or bar. You might think about setting yours out on the table as soon as you sit down as a visual reminder to yourself and the waitstaff that you don’t need a plastic straw. Always let them know directly too – politely, of course. And be kind if they forget – it happens. One of these days, I think restaurants will start coming around on this issue and will cut down on their own straws, at least plastic straws. But for now, if we can do our part and let them know our values, the earth and all its creatures will benefit. You can find these in glass here and stainless steel here.

5. Reusable napkin

This is a great way to cut down on disposable napkins in your life! I carry one of these in my purse all the time. Bonus – it doubles as a hankie in a pinch. Just remember to wash it (remove all ickies after use). I have a few of these so I can toss one in the wash after we use it, and then grab another clean one from our kitchen drawer.

My tip on napkins – at some restaurants and cafes, let the staff know that you don’t need any napkins, because they may try to give you some with your food. And chances are they aren’t expecting you to have a napkin in your pocket or purse. But – surprise – now you do!

You can see the ones I make with organic cotton here. But you can also just cut up an old shirt – knit cotton won’t fray too much (e.g., t-shirt fabric) – and keep that handy if you want to do the super easy DIY route!

My handstamped napkins and tea towels. On display at the farmers market.

6. Reusable utensils

I keep some of these in my purse at all times! There’s nothing worse than bringing home yet another set of plastic utensils that we don’t need because we forgot to bring our own. I’ve even shared with friends in the past – I keep extras in my purse for my kiddos, but I’m happy to let anyone use them! And I wash them after each use. I love small camping sized utensils for my purse, since my current purse is more of an oversized wristlet, and space is limited. I got mine at the local camping store, but you could also find some online or at a health food store. Or, super cheap way to do it – get some used utensils at the thrift store! The Goodwill in my town sells used utensils for about 50 cents each. Deal! If you dig around enough, you may even luck out on some small ones, or even a spork! Sporks are awesome, FYI – spoon + fork = spork!

And don’t forget to let the restaurant/cafe know that you have them! Sometimes they won’t want to reuse a plastic utensil that has just barely touched your plate. I know, it seems wasteful, but they are bound by different health codes. So let them know before they are done putting together your food to avoid this altogether.

7. Reusable snack bags

A super easy alternative to a ziplock or plastic baggie is a cotton snack bag. At my house, we use these for EVERYTHING: sandwiches, crackers, plaintain chips, popcorn, granola, chocolate chips (don’t judge!), pretzels, and more. I also use these to keep a hardboiled egg from getting too crushed in my lunch bag, and I’ll put a little tea strainer with tea leaves in there for making tea when I’m out and about. I’ll even put half an apple in there in a pinch – doesn’t keep it as fresh as a beeswax wrap (see below for more on that!) but it’ll keep the apple from picking up too much random stuff and also from getting everything it touches just a little bit damp and sticky.

Tips for you on these little guys: We have about 10 of these in a couple sizes at my house, and often we use one over and over again a few times before we wash it. I’ll turn it inside out, shake out any crumbs, and let it air out a little overnight, and then put it in my bag again. With things that don’t leave any crumbs (ahem, chocolate chips), I’ll just leave it in my lunch bag for the week or even longer and keep refilling it.

Reusable Snack Bag! With chocolate chips!

You can see a range of fabrics in my Etsy shop here.

8. Good old water bottle.

This is probably the easiest. And you can also probably find some at your thrift store! I like stainless steel or glass for mine – minimizes any potential leaching of toxins from plastic or questionable metals. And I LOVE my Swell which I bought from one of my favorite local stores – Jones and Bones in Capitola. It’s great to get a good product and also shop local at the same time, if you are on the market for a certain brand.

Swell water bottle. Love it!

9. Beeswax wrap

Beeswax wraps are a great alternative to plastic wrap, tin foil, and wax paper. Super eco-friendly. You can use them to wrap up your bowls, plates, or a sandwich or burrito. I also use them to wrap up half an apple or cucumber or avocado. They are super versatile, reusable, and fully biodegradable. You can read all about them in one of my blog posts here and you can buy them here.

Okay, that’s another shameless plug for my loving handmade pieces. I can’t help myself! But if you aren’t into beeswax, there are also vegan ones out there! My favorites are made by a woman in Australia and can be found here. See, it’s not all about me!

And you can also find some great tutorials online if you want to DIY it! Tip on DIY, though: unless you plan to make a whole bunch and maybe give some away as gifts, it may not be worth the time, money, and effort to make these. They are a little messy and some of the ingredients can be pricey and hard to find – and may only be available in packaging, which kind-of defeats the point! BUT don’t let that deter you! I actually enjoy making them, and you might too!

10.  Reusable dish towels

My last eco-product plug: say goodbye to paper towels with dish towels! If you can integrate a dish towel or tea towel into your kitchen, you can eliminate SO MUCH paper waste! This also eliminates the water and energy required to make the paper products. We keep ours on the handle of our oven door, but there are lots of cute clips out there to hang it from a cupboard drawer as well. We use it until it’s grubby and needs to be washed. When we just dry clean dishes with it, it might stay clean for well over a week.

I make mine in upcycled cotton whenever possible for maximum eco-friendly-ness. I also use organic cotton. You can check out my offerings here. You can probably find some at the thrift store too, if you’re not too particular about what’s on it :).

Tip: If you use paper towels for cleaning up spills, let me suggest using rags instead! Turn those old clothes, too old to give away, into rags by cutting them up. We keep a stack in our closet and grab them anytime there’s a spill in the house. Cotton knits are less likely to fray.

Okay, there you have it. My  top 10 eco-friendly products towards a greener, zero waste life. Did I leave out your favorite? Let me know in the comments below! I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Thanks for reading.
Liz

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Top 10 Things to Make with Fabric Scraps

AKA: How to keep fabric scraps out of the landfill and upcycle fabric scraps.

 

I love to sew stuff for me, my family, my friends, and my customers!  That’s probably obvious.  The only bummer of this is that there are almost ALWAYS little scraps and bits leftover from pretty much everything I make.  I try my best to design pieces that minimize this, but some of it is inevitable.  So I’ve been doing some poking around on the interwebs and testing out different ideas to keep these scraps out of the waste stream.  Here is my list of my 10 favorite ways to upcycle fabric scraps.  

 

  1. Pin Cushion
    1. This is just the cutest little pin cushion you ever did see.  A square pin cushion is perfect for using up small squares of fabric (or corners if you do any boxed corners on bags like I do).  I’ve stuffed it with tiny fabric and thread scraps!  No poly-fill necessary!

      Tiny pin cushion. The cutest!
  2. Napkin Rings
    1. We use cloth napkins in our house, so it’s lovely to have each one marked whose-is-whose.  Each napkin ring is in a different fabric, so we never get them mixed up!  Confession: we use our napkins a few times until they need a wash.

      Napkin ring made from fabric scraps!
  3. Cord keeper 
    1. I was getting so tired of constantly having to untangle my headphones.  Ugh.  I finally took a minute (no, make that 3) to sew up this cord keeper with a snap closure.  Be gone, tangles!
      Cord keeper from fabric scraps!

       

  4. Fabric twine.
    1. This stuff just looks so pretty.  I used it to wrap Christmas presents this year.  Twine is a great way to use up long, thin strips of fabric, like selvage edges.  The pieces don’t need to be the same thickness or length, and you can keep adding in more pieces as you go!

      Fabric twine from fabric scraps!
  5. Woven Potholder
    1. This is a great craft for a little one.  I made this little guy on my daughter’s loom, and now she’s made one too.  If you don’t have a loom, they are SUPER easy to make – you can do it out of cardboard!  I weaved my long skinny pieces (like a selvage edge or other strips) and just overlapped them a couple of inches, rather than sewing them together.  You could also knot them together.  Lots of options.  If you want to go bigger, make a placemat!
      Handwoven pot holder. We use it in the kitchen!

      Handwoven placemat. So pretty!
  6. Braided bracelet
    1. Also perfect for long thin strips.  I made a bunch of these for my kiddos and also gave them out to kids at the farmer’s market.  Super easy – another great craft for little ones.  
  7. Patches for clothes
    1. I turned an old stained skirt into hearts for my daughter’s leggings.  Super fun.  Super cute.  

      Patches for leggings from fabric scraps!
  8. Coin purse
    1. This is great for rectangles of fabric.  I modeled them after my snack bags, only much tinier and not always lined.  So fun.
  9. Quilted napkins
    1. I love quilts, but let’s be honest – I ain’t got time to make a whole dang quilt.  That’s where quilted napkins come in!  These are perfect for any shaped scrap.  I’ve used squares to make a simple 4-square napkin design.  But it works great for rectangles or triangles or strips!  The world is your oyster with this one!
  10. Pom poms!
    1. Yes, the world needs more pom poms.  Especially upcycled, handmade, biodegradable ones.  I made these tiny ones by wrapping long thing strips around a fork.  You could use super thin scraps for these.  Aren’t they adorable??  

 

Those are my favorite 10 things to do with scraps right now.  Do you work with fabric scraps?  Do tell!  Would you like to learn more about how to make any of these?  I’d love to hear that too!

 

Thanks for reading,

Liz

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It’s a new year, and time for some zero waste new year’s resolutions!

This year for the first time ever I actually set some goals and WROTE THEM DOWN! Woohoo! I set goals across the important areas of my life, including health, family, friends, money, work, and business. And I ALMOST forgot to set myself some waste-related goals. Whoa. Luckily I caught myself and added some zero waste resolutions for the year. So here they are.

Zero Waste New year’s Resolution #1:
Have at least one 100% freebie-free week with the kids.

Freebies and gifts are one of the major sources of trash in our life still. It’s gotten easier for me to say no to freebies out in the world, but my kids, on the other hand, are still working on this, understandably – it’s freaking hard! Our culture embraces and encourages the act of giving gifts and things, and it can come across as ungrateful or rude to refuse a gift. Unfortunately so many of these freebies are wrapped in plastic or made of plastic or in some other way destined for the landfill. My kids are offered and accept little bits and trinkets pretty much every week from friends, family, school, and outings. Just last week there was a butterfly making project at the library. The butterflies were made of paper (yay!) and wooden laundry clips (yay!) and little pipe cleaners (hmmm…). Not sure what to do with the pipe cleaners – they’re made of metal and synthetic fiber. They can be used over and over again, in theory, but once they break they are landfill foder. A few days before that, my daughter was on an outing with her class and a parent took her and her classmates to Starbucks where everyone got a beverage in a plastic cup with a straw. She’s 9, so it’s hard for her to remember to say no to a straw (heck, I forget to say this still!), and she doesn’t carry around a coffee mug for impromptu visits to Starbucks like me (guilty!). They also got bags of chips at Starbucks, so there’s another source of garbage.

I can’t control my kids every move and I wouldn’t want to. I want them to be able to be in the world making their own decisions. That said, one of my goals for this year is to have a very deliberate week-long period where each of us works to say no freebies, especially freebies with plastic/synthetic/non-recyclable or non-biodegradable pieces.

We’ve already started the conversation, too! In order to try out a full week, we’re going to pick a date, go over our family goals and strategies for polite refusal, and then get started!

2. Have a 100% plastic free week with the kids.

This might sound the same as freebie-free, but there are still some sources of plastic in our life that we buy deliberately on a regular basis. Earth balance (vegan butter), day-old bread from our local bakery, cheese, and tofu. We recycle this packaging, but another goal of mine is avoid all of these for at least one week. My daughters actually brought this idea up! We’ll be picking a week soon (not the same week as the freebie-free week) and going for it! I’ll let you know how it goes.

3. Bike more.

I used to bike ALL THE TIME. I’m not sure what happened, but I’m re-committing myself to biking more! My goal is to use the bike every weekend to take care of a trip or errand. So far in 2018, I’ve managed to use the bike every weekend for something. I took a delivery of No Trace goods downtown just recently. It’s a great way to get a little exercise and reduce my carbon footprint. Over time I’m hoping to do more and more by bike, but I’m starting with weekend rides for now. It feels achievable and would still make a big improvement in my waste reduction.

4. Find zero waste dental options

We go through a lot of floss and toothpaste in our house and we’re a little cavity prone so making our own toothpaste isn’t an option. My goal for this year is to find an affordable biodegradable floss and zero waste toothpaste with flouride online. I haven’t been able to find it in town, so it’s time to take the plunge and look online. I’ve been looking around and I’ll share what I find! Let me know if you have any leads.

So there you have it. My 4 zero waste goals for the year. Do you have any eco-goals for the new year? I’d love to hear about them! Share in the comments below.
Thanks for reading!
Liz

What is zero waste?

 

In simple terms, zero waste is a goal of maximizing our planet’s resources by keeping resources in the life cycle and out of the landfill.  The ideas behind the zero waste movement center around redesigning our lives and environments so that our resources remain in a cycle of creation, use, and recycling.

 

What is a zero waste business?

 

A zero waste business embraces this philosophy of maximizing and reusing resources throughout every stage of design, production, distribution, use, and recycling or reuse.  In addition to considering the life cycle of all materials used in a business, zero waste philosophy means working with sustainable resources, such as recycled or all natural, biodegradable materials.

 

No Trace is a zero waste business.

 

At No Trace, I think about what it means to be a zero waste business everyday, and about where my raw materials are coming from, and where they will end up.  I also think about how my pieces are made and the overall impact of their creation.  I ask myself: what good will this product have on the planet and for the people who use it?  Here are the steps I take towards zero waste.  Note that I don’t claim to be perfect or to have all the anwers, but I am doing my best to be sustainable.  If you have ideas or suggestions for me, please share!  I am always open to improvement.

  1. Use of raw materials that are sustainable  
    • I use only 100% natural, biodegradable materials in all of my production.  This includes 100% cotton thread, 100% natural fiber fabric, and 100% natural and biodegradable fabric paint (which I make).

      My homemade paint in jars.
    • I use only use organic cotton or recycled cotton fabric.  The production of organic cotton does not pollute our soil or water with toxic chemicals as does conventional cotton.  Whenever possible, I source fabrics from second-hand sources (i.e., thrift stores) and repurpose them into functional pieces for the zero waste home.   
    • My racks are made by me with untreated wood.  This keeps them free of toxins and means that they can easily be composted or used in the occasional bonfire :). 

      One of my DIY racks. No finish required.
    • I’ve started using old corks and transforming them into buttons.
      Action shot! Making buttons. Don’t worry, I am very careful with the knife.

      .

  • Raw materials are obtained with minimal packaging.
    • This means avoiding plastic bags or any unnecessary packaging.  I buy my beeswax from local bee farmers free of packaging whenever possible.  I buy with recyclable packaging when I can’t get things package-free.  I always consider the type of packaging before purchasing, and make purchasing decisions based on the packaging.  
  • Tools and equipment are obtained second-hand whenever possible.
    • Most of the equipment used in making my beeswax wraps, for example, is from second hand stores.  Used tools and equipment are my first choice for all required No Trace equipment.
    • Equipment used in markets and fairs is mostly second hand or borrowed.  In fact, I may have overstayed my borrowing welcome with some friends on a few pieces 🙂 …

      Another DIY rack.
  • No waste is made in the creation of No Trace pieces.
    • Every scrap bit of thread and fabric is saved and repurposed into something else.  For example, I’ve made paper from thread bits and cell phone cases from fabric bits.  I’ve made twine and drawstring ties from long thin pieces of fabric scraps, including the selvage edge.

      Twine and pom poms
    • Every bit of paper is saved and turned into handmade paper.  I incorporate bits and strands of thread into this paper.

      Handmade paper from Farm Day at Terra Prana farm.
    • Patterns are designed with a minimizing of scraps in mind.
    • Right now, after about a year of production, I have less than one jar of waste from No Trace.  It is almost all stickers.  I’ve considered trying to turn them into a collage…I’m not sure how appealing this collage would be, though.  For now they are snug in my jar under my.    

      Weaving scraps into a potholder.
  • No Trace packaging is eco-friendly.
    • I use recycled paper and paper twine to package my pieces.  Both of these can be composted or recycled.  I recently learned that it’s better to compost small pieces of paper that otherwise get lost in the recycling process.  My recommendation is to compost the twine and paper unless your recycling plant has a specific paper pick up that minimizes loss.
    • I use recycled mailing materials whenever possible, and print directly onto my envelopes when possible.  I have had to print mailing labels on a few occasions, which results in these small squares of waxed paper.  These have several uses, apparentely, so I’m saving them for a TBD project or to pass on to another artist.  Contact me if you have any interest.
  • No Trace pieces are designed to stay out of the landfill.
    • Don’t throw it out!  No Trace pieces are designed to last a very long time.  When the fabric starts to wear out after a number of years, it can be repurposed into a cleaning rag and eventually composted, or, in the case of beeswax wraps, re-waxed after a year or more.  
    • I am always here and available for any end-of-life needs around your No Trace products – just ask!  Think of me as hospice for your pieces 🙂 .  Depending on the supply of aged No Trace products, I’d love to incorporate these scraps into new designs where possible.

      A larger weaving from scraps.
  • No Trace is solar powered!  
    • No Trace is still based out of my home, but my home is solar powered!   Well, to be technical, my family pays extra to the electric company so that we can subsidize solar and other green sources of energy to the grid, in an amount that offsets the electricity that we use each month.  Does that make sense?  I didn’t think so.  It doesn’t to me, either.  But there you have it.  No Trace uses green energy.
  • No Trace is bicycle powered!
    • Okay, this is a stretch for me, but whenever possible I DO make local deliveries by bike, especially to the shops in the Capitola area that carry my goods.
  • No Trace is Prius powered!
    • That’s more like it.  I roll-up to the farmer’s market in the Prius.  Yes, it all fits.  I can even squeeze two kids and a grown up in the car with me.  BOOM.

 

There is always room for improvement in growing a zero waste business.  I’m hoping to find more sources of package free raw materials.  I’d love to extend my bicycle deliveries around town.  And I know there are steps towards sustainability that aren’t even on my radar.  But the efforts I’m making so far feel like a strong start.

 

Thanks for reading!

 

Liz @ No Trace

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Beautiful Big Sur Bike Tour

 

(and only a tiny bit of trash!)

 

I recently did a three day bike tour in Big Sur with my partner and a couple of dear friends.  At the writing of this post, about 30 miles of Highway 1, which winds along stunning mountain cliffs above the ocean, is very difficult to access due to a mudslide on the south end and a broken bridge on the north end.  This makes it an amazing, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to bike with very few cars on the road.  So we did!  And I am so grateful to have done it.  Special shout out to my in-laws and my friends’ parents for watching our kids during this time and letting us experience this beautiful ride.

 

One of my goals, other than enjoying the amazing views, good food, and cold beers, was to tour without creating waste.  I was pretty close, but had a couple of “I’m starving!” moments and some of my planning was off, which led to some waste.

 

Here Are my zero waste successes

 

and failures from this awesome trip.  

 

Day 1

We started in Carmel, CA, and biked about 30 miles to Fernwood Resort in northern Big Sur (before the first road closure).  Here are our stops along the way:

 

DIY Bike Tour Stop #1:  

We started with lunch in Carmel at a taqueria.  They served us on real plates with real serving ware and my partner and I used our own reusable napkins.  Zero waste success!  The tacos were awesome, of course.  And we were full and ready to bike!

My smooth ride!

Stop 2:  We biked several miles down the coast, stopped briefly in Point Lobos State Reserve, and for a photo here and there.  Our main second stop was the Rocky Point Restaurant.  We had to get a cocktail it was – the only stop for the rest of our day along this beautiful coastline, and it has gorgeous views and famous bloody mary’s 🙂 .  We decided to get a round of bloody mary’s to help power us up the hills 🙂 and I forgot to say “no straw, please”!  Ack!  I don’t get drinks out too often, but you’d think I’d remember this by now!  So, here’s my reminder when I place my order (say it with me): No straw, please. No straw, please. No straw, please.  

The lovely grounds at Rocky Point Restaurant

Stop 3:  We biked several more miles (who’s counting??), up to the top of Hurricane Point and then back down again.  Although far from a hurricane, Hurricane Point is quite a little micro-climate of fog and strong winds.  We felt a little like we might get blown off the hillside.  We stopped for a quick photo and snacks from New Leaf bulk bins (cacao energy nibs, fancy nut mix, and sesame sticks).  Nothing to buy, nothing to throw away!

Liz at the top of Hurricane Point.

 

The dudes enjoying the view at Hurricane Point

 

Stop 4: After another several miles we were nearing our destination!  But we had to stop and check out one of our favorite state parks – Andrew Molera – before calling it a day.  We visited Andrew Molera Beach by walking and riding our bikes over a wooden bridge and about a mile along a dirt path.  We shared some the same snacks from bulk.  We also had a beer that we recycled AND we picked up some garbage on the beach.  Leaving things a little cleaner feels great.

Enjoying a rest at Andrew Molera State Beach

 

Stop 5:  At the end of the day we made it to Fernwood Resort and checked into our room.  We were all starving and a little desperate for showers, so we got a bag of chips to hold us over while we all showered and let our little ones/grandparents know we had made it safely the first day. Why do potato chips have to be so delicious???  In hindsight, it would have been smart to plan a special treat for the end of each day so we could have resisted the delicious potato chips calling our name at the resort mini-market.   After chips and showers, we ate dinner at the Fernwood Resort restaurant, which uses real plates, cutlery, and napkins.  Yes.  

 

Day 2 of our DIY, Low Waste, Big Sur Bike Tour

The second day we biked from Fernwood just a few miles to the northern road closure on Highway 1, which is the result of a broken bridge.  We carried our bikes and gear about a ½ mile and 150 steps UP to the other side of Hwy 1.  Phew.  Then we biked about 30 miles along the most gorgeous, jaw-dropping part of Hwy 1 to a cabin.  Here are the stops we made on day 2:

 

Stop 1:  I thought we’d be able to eat breakfast at the Fernwood, which was a silly thought because Fernwood doesn’t serve breakfast.  So we checked out Fernwood’s mini-market again.  They had breakfast muffins, which came in a paper wrapper and coffee, which only came in a disposable cup.  Doh!  Reusable coffee mugs are zero waste 101!  I can’t believe I failed on that one.  But I did.  If I’d done a little more research I could have figured this out.  We didn’t bring coffee mugs since we were trying to travel light.  But maybe I could have squeezed one on board just in case.  Heck, it’d keep beer cold too!  This also made me wish we had some sort of traveling composter…some way to transport and start the breakdown process when you travel.  That’s a project for another day.  Back to our journey…

 

Stop 2: So, we had to get a real breakfast.  A quarter of a store-bought muffin was never going to get us over those mountains.  We headed to the closest spot, the Lodge at Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park.  I have to share, and I do hate to complain much about service since I was a waitress once and I know it’s a tough job, but this was literally the worst service I’ve ever had.  EVER.  In my LIFE.  The four of us never received silverware or a napkin.  We shared one fork, one knife, and one napkin between the four of us.  Seriously.  I am not joking.  We got creative and used toast as a utensil, but it was pretty pathetic.  And I can’t blame the crowd since there were probably 4 other tables seated at the time.  I would not recommend the lodge for dining to anyone.  But, on the plus side, we had one napkin and it was fabric, and fewer utensils to wash – so I guess it was a super eco way to eat :).

 

Stop 3: After our leisurely breakfast we carried our bikes up about 150 steps and some very steep hillside to the other side of the downed bridge.  It. was. hard.  Luckily, we helped each other out and made it happen.  

The path around the downed bridge on Highway 1 in Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park. Some how this doesn’t quite capture the steep-ness of it.
We made it to the top of the path!

 

At the top of the hill was a pub with fresh made sandwiches and cold beer on tap.  Of course we had to stop for both.  The one bummer about this stop was that the pub used plastic cups instead of glass.  What the heck?  Who wants to drink cold, fancy, $6-a-pint beer on tap out of a plastic cup?  Well, we did, apparently.  We left the cups there to get “recycled”.  I’m not sure what the fate of those cups was, truthfully.  This and coffee-gate, above, are making a strong case for bringing a travel mug on all future bike tours.  I think they come in pint sizes too.  Drat!  Next time…

 

Stop 4: We made it about 1 mile to our next stop.  Note that we stopped 4 times in the first 5 miles or so.  We weren’t making any speed records, here, people.  But don’t worry, we made it to our ultimate destination before dark (that was my main concern) and were having a lot of fun.  Back to stop 4.  There was a cute, random, road side taco stand 1 mile down the road from the pub.  We HAD to stop and check it out and get some tacos.  These came on paper plates.  Ugh.  This gets me thinking about folding, lightweight, travel plates.  Another project for another day…  

 

Stop 5: There was basically nowhere left to spend any money after the taco stand.  Just miles of open, beautiful road.  We stopped at Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park and ate the sandwiches we bought at the pub while we overlooked the most magical beach and waterfall.  It was stunning.  The sandwiches were awesome.  We had another beer, of course.  

Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park. This doesn’t capture the beauty at all.

Stop 6:  There was a look-out spot further down Hwy 1 where we stopped briefly to enjoy the view, but at this point we were also hoping that the cabin was close and the ladies in the group were getting a little antsy to press on, so we did.

 

This is how I felt when we made it to the cabin.

Stop 7: The cabin!  It was super beautiful, with a small creek and beach, amazing views, and a full kitchen.  

The views were stunning!\

We came prepared to make our own dinner – pasta (from bulk) and pasta sauce in a jar (which we recycled) and nutritional yeast (from bulk) and texturized vegetable protein (also from bulk).  The pasta was delicious.  We slept hard that night.  

Zero waste dinner success!

 

Day 3 of our DIY Bike Tour

On our last day of biking, we went from the cabin back north toward Carmel through Pfeiffer Big Sur State park again, where friends left our car (funny/not funny story about that in a bit).  We woke up in the cabin and made breakfast.  I’d brought fixings for fancy oatmeal: oats, raisins, chia seeds, chopped walnuts, coconut cream and apples (all of it from bulk except the can of coconut cream).  I also brought coffee and the cabin had compost!  Zero waste breakfast success.  We had some leftover coconut cream, which we put in our coffee; and leftover oats, which we carried with us.  We still had a good number of snacks for our last day: cacoa energy nibs (our FAVS), sesame sticks (second favs), fancy nuts (third favs), and plaintain chips (least favs.  Sorry plaintain chips).  So we set off on our journey.  Our goal for the morning was to make it to Post Ranch Inn by 1pm for a fancy lunch reservation, an anniversary treat to all four of us who were married within about 10 days of each other, 11 years ago.  It is a spendy kind of lunch, so it’s got to be a special celebration.  And it meant we didn’t need to pack a lunch – just continue working on our tasty snacks.   So, here are the stops on day 3.

 

Stop 1:  We were a little nervous about making it to our reservation on time, so we hustled quite a ways before making a mandatory snack stop, somewhere near Esalen Institute (an amazing place, everyone should go!).  We ate some of the leftover oats on the side of road and then pushed on through.  Another zero waste pit-stop success!  

 

Stop 2:  We were making some pretty good time, eager and a little desperate to make our lunch reservation.  We stopped again after another hour or so of biking.  No businesses in site, so we just enjoyed our snacks on the side of the road again, enjoying the amazing views.  We probably shared a beer too.  🙂

Stop 3:  That super cute taco stand called to us again!  Despite the fact that it is only a mile from our destination/lunch reservation, we had to stop and check it out.  Unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on whose side you were on), it was still closed since it wasn’t quite noon.  We took a couple photos and pushed on up the hill toward Post Ranch.  We realized we were still pretty early, so we went to a spot a little further up with a great view of the coast and sat on the side of road again (so many amazing views on this trip, it was absurd).  

After a bit, we decided we had time to also go to Nepenthe, which was just above us, and have a drink before our fancy lunch.  It seemed like a great idea at the time :).  It was though, really.  We had a lovely cocktail on their beautiful outdoor patio.  They used paper napkins and no straws in our drinks.  No waste!  Then it was time to go.

 

Stop 4: Only about 15 minutes late, we rolled in to the Post Ranch Inn – Sierra Mar restaurant – for our lunch reservation.  This place is awesome.  The ranch land itself is just gorgeous and makes you want to spend a week (and your retirement savings) there at the ranch.  Then you get to the restaurant, which is ridiculous – beautiful views of the ocean and coast, and the building itself is build into the cliff, which makes you feel like you are standing above the ocean.  Just incredible.  You feel like you are up in the clouds when you eat there.  The water below is just stunning – black rocks edged in white sea foam jutting out of the turquoise Pacific, with patches of cinnamon-colored kelp swaying just under the surface.  Seriously, deliciousness for your eyes.  So wonderful.  Actually, that is the water all along the Big Sur coast.  If you’ve never been, you need to go.  Anyway, this little restaurant has been cut off from its regular suppliers due to the road damage, but they are doing a great job of maintaining awesome offerings and a wonderful atmosphere.  We had wonderful meals and fancy cocktails and just an all around lovely, leisurely, well-earned lunch 🙂 .  And, this place is way too classy for any sort of disposables.  Another zero waste success!!!  Way to go team!!!

Anniversary smooch.

Stop 5: Okay, here is where the end of trip got a little discombobulated (remember I talked about the car being in the parking lot?).  So, for some BIZARRE reason, I got it stuck in my head that the car would be at the Andrew Molera State Park parking lot, which is about 5 miles north of Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park.  So, we biked through the park, and another 5 miles to the wrong place.  Ugh, Liz, read your dang emails!!  Luckily, there was a shuttle back to the park AND the dudes had the energy to bike back down and didn’t even want to take the shuttle.  So, that’s what they did.  And they finally found the car.  And we finally got it in it.  Phew.  Sorry, guys.

 

Stop 6:  I’m not sure if this counts as a stop or not but we slept our last night together at our friend’s cousin’s house.  She is a professional chef and let’s just say it was an AMAZING dinner.  It was like eating at home, if you were married to a professional chef.   And way to classy for disposables.  Is that classist?  Well, you know what I mean.  Another zero waste meal, with wonderful company.

 

So that’s it.  Such a wonderful experience.  I am so glad we took advantage of this rare time in Big Sur history to have the road to ourselves.  It was just jaw-dropping view after jaw-dropping view.  So much beauty.  And the time with friends and hubby was so rejuvenating.  To all you parents of young ones out there:  if you can make it happen to slip away for a night or two, go for it!  And to my last goal – I did a pretty good job of minimal waste on the trip.  Other than a couple of oversights, I kept my carbon footprint to a minimum.  Did I mention we drove 4 people and 4 bikes in a Toyota Prius?  It’s do-able.  

There you have it .
my zero waste successes and lessons learned.

 

I am ready for the next ride!!

 

Thanks for reading!

Liz

We just finished our first family backpacking trip and it was amazing! I’m proud to announce that my kiddos hiked 14 miles over 2.5 days with their packs, thanks to all the training hikes my partner did with them. And my accomplishment is that we had awesome (near) zero waste food and snacks all the way! We even carried out our compost (not much) and picked up other people’s trash during our trip.  Here’s my proud kids near the end of the hike.

I noticed that lots of campers bring freeze-dried, single packaged items for their meals, and individually packaged bars for their snacks. I’m here to tell you that it’s possible to backpack without all of that packaging. 🙂

Just as an overview to our trip – we went to Big Basin State Park in California. On the first day, we left for the trip after work to park and camp near the trail head. We brought dinner with us, pre-made, so didn’t have to cook that night. On the second day, we hiked 6 strenuous miles along the Sunset Trail and camped at a back country campground called Sunset Camp that night. On the third day, we hiked 6 miles along Berry Creek Trail and Skyline to the Sea Trail and camped at a second back country site called Twin Redwoods Camp. On our last day, we hiked out 2 miles along the Skyline to the Sea Trail and ended at Waddell Beach, where we got picked up by Grandpa. The trails were beautiful and Berry Creek Trail has three stunning waterfalls along it. Well worth the effort.  In the picture you can see how large the falls are in relation to us.

So, to the food! Backpacking food doesn’t have the best reputation for being delicious. It is one of the trickier parts of the experience – you want to have enough to eat after serious hiking, but you have to pack light. In planning for this trip, we searched the bulk bins at our local health food stores to see what we could find that would be tasty, filling, and easy to carry and cook.  We put everything into plastic bags that we re-use, since plastic is light and water resistant.

Here’s the food we took:

3 Breakfasts (everything from Staff of Life bulk bins):
  • Quick cooking oats
  • Raisins, dried cherries, and chopped dried apricots
  • Chopped nuts
  • Chia seeds
  • Two pears (from our tree ☺️)
  • Brown sugar
  • Dried hot cocoa mix
  • Dried soy vanilla protein powder – we mixed these last two for a type of “hot cocoa”. We need to work on our ratios because the first day it was very watery, and the second day it was like a pudding :).

This is a pic of our cooking and camping set up.

Lunches: (almost everything from Staff of Life bulk bins)
  • Dried hummus (delicious!)
  • olive oil in an old plastic water bottle
  • Sun-dried tomatoes*
  • Cucumber (from our garden ☺️)
  • Pita bread*
Dinner 1: (some bulk, some packaged items)

Burritos from home with flour tortillas*, home cooked beans and rice, avocados, cheese*, and cabbage tossed in Veganaise.

 

Don’t the burritos look cute snuggled together?

 

 

 

Dinner 2: (almost everything from Staff bulk!)
  • Instant refried pinto beans
  • Instant vegetarian chili (we mixed these two together)
  • Corn tortillas*
  • Avocado

The combo of chili and pinto beans was sooo delicious! I’m seriously going to keep those ingredients on hand at home for instant beans.

 

Dinner 3: (all from Staff bulk!)
  • Dried pasta
  • Texturized veggie protein (TVP) chunks (i.e., veggie “chicken” that you rehydrate)
  • Instant veggie soup rehydrated and strained on top of the pasta as a sauce
  • Olive oil and salt

Here’s a pic of our dinner set-up for night 3.  

Snacks: (all from New Leaf bulk bins)
  • Cacao energy nibs – like energy bar squares and soooo delicious – seriously, as tasty as dessert!
  • Sesame sticks
  • Fancy mixed nuts
  • Dried mangos

We also brought plaintain chips from Staff bulk but didn’t need these at all for snacking. I also tried making coffee with my compostable filters and fresh grounds, but this was a challenge and I need to do more research for next time. Complete fail.

A note about energy bars – my kids prefer the energy nibs to just about every packaged energy bar out there. And they come in bulk! I am so stoked we discovered these. Our hiking friends brought packaged bars and my girls preferred our snacks to theirs, despite the enticing, shiny wrappers.

Not everything was from bulk – the items marked with a * came in plastic bags that we can recycle. There used to be bulk sun-dried tomatoes in town and I won’t give up my search for more sun-dried tomatoes. Or maybe this is the year I make some ☺️. I’ll also keep thinking about other items we could use in the future to substitute for the pita and tortillas (or make some tortillas for the trip if I’m organized enough!)

There you have it. Do you have fun recipes for zero waste backpacking or backpacking in general? Do share! And thanks for reading.

 

 

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The amount of textile waste in the US has grown tremendously over the last couple of decades.  The US contributes about 15 million tons of textiles to the landfills each year.  This is particularly depressing given that up to 95% of textiles could be diverted from the landfills with recycling and reuse efforts.  (See smartasn.org for more information on textile waste and recycling).  

 

The fashion industry is a major contributor to this waste, especially fast fashion brands that make cheap, not-built-to-last articles of clothing (e.g., Forever 21, Top Shop – see Newsweek’s 9/9/2016 article about fast fashion).  Typically the clothes from these stores don’t sell as well at second-hand shops, and can end up donated overseas where their poor quality makes them less desirable as well.

 

As someone who is introducing textiles into the world, I am particularly concerned about keeping my textiles (and others) out of the landfill.  Luckily, there are many ways to keep them out of the waste stream and in circulation.  Here’s my top ten ways to keep textiles like clothes and household fabrics out of the landfill:

 

No Trace’s 10 list for keeping textiles out of the landfill:

  1. Shop less, buy quality, and extend the life of your clothes and household textiles.
  2. Buy secondhand whenever possible.
  3. Buy from companies that recycle their products or used recycled materials (e.g., Patagonia, Eileen Fisher, and Insecta).
  4. Purchase 100% natural fiber fabrics (e.g., cotton, wool, hemp), rather than synthetic fabrics, which can be composted at the end of their lifecycle.  Purchase organic when you can as well.  
  5. Repurpose your textiles into something functional like a bag, bin, or a t-shirt quilt once they are worn out or outgrown.
  6. Find a fabric recycler near you:   smartasn.org has resources
  7. Find an artist, local art organization, art school, or even an animal shelter that might be interested in donations.
  8. Re-purpose your worn or stained items into hankerchiefs, papertowels, washclothes, and rags for use around the house.
  9. Donate your gently used things to a second hand store.  Note that these donations, if they don’t sell, can end up in the landfill.  Estimates range from only 20% all the way to 75% of donated clothes are resold.  (See Newsweek’s 9/9/2016 article for details).
  10. Compost as a very last resort if it is 100% natural fibers – shred it first and remove any buttons or zippers.

 

I hope this list helps!  I’m making efforts to reduce my textile waste.  One of my resolutions this year is not to buy any clothes for the rest of 2017.  I’d love to hear from you – what are you going to do to reduce your textile footprint?

 

Thanks for reading!

 

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